Oncoral ™

Leveraging saliva components to improve prognosis and quality of life of cancers patients.

US expenditure for 15 most common cancers

Source:  US National Cancer Institute Report

Oral cancer etiology – from tobacco/cancer to HPV prevalence
HPV prevalence identified in approximately 16% of tumor specimens collected between 1984 & 1989, versus 72% of tumor specimens collected between 2000 & 2004. A trend affecting younger populations.
HPV positive group is the fastest growing segment of oral cancer population

Oncoral

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

Oral cancer disease is the consequence of prolonged presence of specific carcinogenic molecules from alcohol/tobacco or cell integration of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) into oral cavity.

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Saliva test
Institut clinident developed a new strategy for oral cancer risk measurement using stabilized saliva for HPV identification and saliva volatolomics analysis. The method and the volatolomics profile of saliva in relation with oral cancer has been patented by the laboratory.

Saliva HPV is risk factor and not a diagnosis.

HPV Status and Prognosis
Doctors will be able to use the results to classify these cancers as HPV positive or negative and offer treatment accordingly.

Risk of death from HPV positive oropharyngeal cancer to be between 50-80 per cent lower than HPV negative tumors but patients are usually younger so may face a lifetime of treatment-related side effects.

Classifying the HPV status of the cancer can offer eligible patients less intensive treatment with reduced side-effects. “get the most appropriate treatment for their cancer”.

HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers have better outcomes and fewer relapses after treatment than HPV-negative cancers.

HPV vaccine strategy is under development is some territories (Austria) for males and females

Benefits:
Doctors will be able to use the results to classify these cancers as HPV positive or negative and offer treatment accordingly.
Classifying the HPV status of the cancer can offer eligible patients less intensive treatment with reduced side-effects. “get the most appropriate treatment for their cancer”.

Oral cancer symptoms and signs

  • Persistent mouth sore: A sore in the mouth that does not heal is the most common symptom of oral cancer
  • Pain: Persistent mouth pain is another common oral cancer sign
  • A lump or thickening in the cheek
  • A white or red patch on the gums, tongue, tonsil, or lining of the mouth
  • A sore throat or feeling that something is caught in the throat that does not go away
  • Difficulty swallowing or chewing
  • Difficulty moving the jaw or tongue
  • Numbness of the tongue or elsewhere in the mouth
  • Jaw swelling that makes dentures hurt or fit poorly
  • Loosening of teeth
  • Pain in teeth or jaw
  • Voice changes
  • A lump in the neck
  • Weight loss
  • Persistent bad breath

Technical recommendations and OncoralTM objectives

  • It is advised to carry out an analysis in the following situations:
  • Patient with any symptoms or signs
  • Patient that smoke (more than 45 years old)
  • Patient that drink (more than 45 years old)
  • Patient with poor oral hygiene
  • Patient with genital HPV or other HPV infection
  • 6 months after the first positive oral saliva test
  • Annually for all patients at risk